Dota 2 Based Questions Appear in a Dutch Math Exam Paper

Dota 2 Based Questions Appear in a Dutch Math Exam Paper

Rakshak Kathuria
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  • Questions based around the Dota 2 universe were recently asked in a Dutch Math exam paper.
  • The way the questions were formulated and explained so that they were relevant to Dota 2 was fascinating, involving various aspects of the game like heroes, lanes, Battle Pass and the TI prize pool.
  • There were a total of five questions related to gaming and esports culture, four of which were centred around Dota 2.

Questions based around the Dota 2 universe were recently asked in a Dutch Math exam paper. The way the questions were formulated and explained so that they were relevant to Dota 2 was fascinating. They involved various aspects of the game like heroes, lanes, Battle Pass and the TI prize pool. However, the main purpose of the exam paper was to test the students on the concepts of “Statistic and Combinatorics.” There were a total of five questions related to gaming and esports culture, four of which were centred around Dota 2.

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Questions involving Dota 2 asked in a Dutch Math Exam Paper

The creator of these questions seems to be an avid Dota 2 fan since the four questions surrounding the MOBA were explained in adequate detail. The exam was originally written in Dutch, but was translated to English by Reddit user, u/jurgy94.

The first question in the paper (Q13) was deeply rooted in esports, as it asked the students to calculate the year in which total prize pools from esports events would top $1 billion dollars if the prize pools continued to grow exponentially.

The second question was based on Dota 2’s heroes and the concept of combinations.

“In this game, there are 112 different heroes, which are subdivided into three categories: there are 49 attackers, 27 defenders and the remaining heroes are support heroes.

At the start of the game, both teams pick according to a complicated system alternately their heroes. Each hero can be only picked once.

It is common that each team consists of two attackers, one defender and two support heroes.

Calculate the number of possible combinations with two attackers, one defender and two support heroes.”

The third question also tested the students’ proficiency in combinations. Dota 2 heroes and lanes were mentioned in this one.

“Teams always choose to occupy each of the three zones with at least one hero. A possible allocation if for instance 1 hero in North, 1 hero in Middle, 2 heroes in South and 1 roaming hero. We assume that it is not important which hero is in which zone.

Calculate how many of these allocations there are for one team if each of the zones North, Middle and South contain at least one hero.”

In the fourth question, the process of funding the TI6 prize pool through the Battle Pass was explained. It then subsequently asked the students to calculate the number of days in which Dota 2 enthusiasts had spent a total of 40 million dollars on the TI6 Battle Pass.


In the fifth and final question, students were asked to find the derivative of the total prize money on June 30, 2016, when the prize pool had witnessed a sudden surge. 

The community, as always, left no stone unturned to joke around and comment on the Dota 2 based exam paper. 

One of the questions included a line, “we assume that it is not important which hero is in which zone,” to which a user commented, “Herald gameplay approves.” 

Another user savagely sent a comment on Valve’s Dota 2 tutorial, writing, “Dutch math exams have better onboarding than the game does.”

One of the most hilarious ones involved a user joking about the recent coaching controversy.

“If a tournament organizer sends an email to X teams, and each team has 5 players, and the probability of a Dota player reading their email is Y, calculate the likelihood of only 1 team reading the email.”


Rakshak is an undergrad, an inquisitive person who likes to acquire information and knowledge of varied sectors in esports. However, his current focus is specifically on Dota 2.