Opinion: Why TI10's Relocation to Bucharest is a Blessing in Disguise

Opinion: Why TI10's Relocation to Bucharest is a Blessing in Disguise

Daniel Royte
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Highlights
Valve recently announced the relocation of this year’s The International 10 (TI10) to Bucharest, Romania from the previously planned location of Stockholm, Sweden.
This change brings many new avenues of possibilities due to the substantial break before TI10 and we think this might be more beneficial than it seems.
The move to Bucharest, Romania seems like a win-win situation for everyone involved. The fans, teams, and players, have waited a long time for TI10 and it seems like we might be getting the best version that could have been hoped for.

Valve recently announced the relocation of this year’s The International 10 (TI10) to Bucharest, Romania from the previously planned location of Stockholm, Sweden after an unfortunate series of events that led to the need for a new location. This change has brought with it an approximately three-month postponement to TI10 as it will now be held in October instead of August. This change brings many new avenues of possibilities due to the substantial break before TI10 and we think this might be more beneficial than it seems.

Here is why this change is a blessing in disguise;

1. The gap gives teams and players additional time to recuperate and prepare for TI10

One can never be too prepared for an exam. Or in this case, TI10, the biggest Dota 2 tournament in the world. With the relatively short period of time between the previous major and the TI qualifiers, teams barely had the opportunity to take the time to recuperate and rest. This gap will provide just that. Teams have additional time to figure out travel arrangements and more importantly, passports and visas, which have been a nuisance for teams that travel to different locations.

Another benefit is that teams now have the time to set up boot camps and scrims to maintain their form and get extra preparation. This also opens up opportunities for third party tournaments where teams will have a competitive environment to test, determine and fine tune the meta at the highest level of play.

It is also possible that with the additional time that they now have, teams won’t feel the need to take a break after TI like many teams have done in the past.

2. The delay and relocation has made it possible for a live audience at TI10

The original plan of TI10 in Stockholm, Sweden did not include the participation of a live audience at the event. However, with the relocation of the event Valve announced that there would indeed be a live audience at the new location, in the Arena Nationala, Bucharest, Romania. This is an obvious win for the fans who will now, no doubt be there to witness the event.

Spectators are an integral part of any sport including esports. It is the crowd that cheers for the players. It is the crowd that gets hyped when players make good plays. And it is the crowd that chants and goes wild when something truly magnificent happens. The spectators drive the players to some extent and there are players who have admitted to being fueled by the chants of the crowd.

It is the spectators who share their stories with other people and bring in new players. It is ultimately the fans who keep games and esports alive.

3. Bucharest is much cheaper in comparison to Stockholm

The cost of living in Bucharest is simply much cheaper than that of Stockholm, making it easier and more comfortable for fans who are planning on attending the event live. It would allow fans from countries and regions around the world, regardless of economic disparity, to attend TI.

4. The long gap is an opportunity for Valve to drop patch 7.30 before TI10

With the nearly three months of a gap that we have before TI10, it is a good opportunity for Valve to release a big patch as the teams and players would have the time to dissect and get used to the changes. It feels like the necessity for a new patch is at an all-time high as the meta is riddled with overpowered heroes, and the game state has become somewhat stale with the longevity of the current patch. This would not only revive and change the way the game is played, but it would also create space for a new meta and bring freshness for the many viewers who will no doubt watch TI10.

On the other hand, if there was no significant time gap before TI10 like there is now, it would be a bad idea since teams wouldn’t have time to adapt to the new changes or determine the meta. They would be going blind into the most important tournament of their lives, which would result in relatively poor quality games, which of course is not what you want to see in the biggest Dota 2 tournament of the year.

All in all, the move to Bucharest, Romania seems like a win-win situation for everyone involved. The fans, teams, and players, have waited a long time for TI10 and it seems like we might be getting the best version that could have been hoped for.

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Daniel is an under-grad and has grown up with esports titles like Dota 2 cultivating a passion for esports. His current beats include in-depth coverage of Dota 2 and Mobile Legends.