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CS:GO Pro Unknowingly Uses a Knife With an Offensive Name Tag

Aditya Singh Rawat
10/Jul/2020 03:47 pm
  • Chinese pro DeStRoYeR was unknowingly using a knife with an offensive name tag.
  • Jason Kaplan was the one who actually brought this issue to light and resolved it as well.
  • It seems the skin was not owned by DeStRoYeR, he just borrowed it from someone else.

American esports commentator and host Jason “JKaplan” Kaplan had brought to light some serious news when he had spotted JiaMing “DeStRoYeR” Gu playing with a knife that was named as “LGBT Slayer”. But as fingers were starting to point towards the player the matter got diffused as it was later revealed that the player had actually borrowed the skin and that he will not be using it anymore.


CS:GO Player Unknowingly Hurts LGBT Community

CS:GO pro player DeStRoYeR who currently plays for the Chinese esports organization Invictus Gaming was recently spotted playing with a ‘Butterfly Knife | Slaughter’ that had an abusive name tag reading “LGBT Slayer”. This information was unknown to the player who had actually borrowed the particular knife from someone else and was not the real owner of the item.

The information had initially come to light via a tweet made by Jason Kaplan in which he had pointed out that DeStRoYeR was using a weapon skin with a disturbing name. He had stated that although he has come across a lot of disgusting weapon skin names that users keep in CS:GO, the one used by DeStRoYeR was the worst of them all.

Though just a few hours later Kaplan gave an update on the situation saying that the skin was actually borrowed and that the player will not be using it again. This was enough to clear DeStRoYeR’s name from the building controversy as multiple users came to support the player by sharing their insight on the situation.

Among the users was twitter CS:GO personality Haci (@DonHaci) who said that, the weapon could have been sponsored by a website or a fan as these things were super common in China where collectors lend their skins to pro players.


Kaplan went on to educate the audience by saying that people who are not sure of what a weapon is named or what it means, they should try to look it up and try to find its meaning rather than just sit back and ignore it. As for a professional player, as people look up to them they should not allow something like this to happen at all.

According to the users who responded to the Tweet, it seems that such offensive name tags are a deeply rooted problem within the community. DeStRoYeR is certainly lucky that he was able to prove to Kaplan that the knife was not originally owned by him.



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Aditya Singh Rawat is the in-house CS:GO editor at AFK Gaming. While his understanding of the esports space is not restricted by geographical borders, his current focus lies in the Asian region. Understands and follows almost all major esport titles.